English proverb of the day

"The negative side of the American Dream comes when people pursue success at any cost, which in turn destroys the vision and the dream "

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  • Topic of this Week: "Are you a xenophile? (December 16, 2018)"

    Xenophobia is a fear or dislike of outsiders.  Yet, there exists an opposite perspective called xenophilia. A xenophile  is a person who is attracted by foreign things such as objects, people,  styles or customs.
      Do you feel excited when you make acquaintance  with a foreigner? Have you ever invited a foreign guy to take part in a  birthday party of another friend of yours? If yes, you are probably a  xenophile. But don’t be ashamed,  xenophilia is not totally negative. If you set foot in another country,  and you are surrounded by the local people who are xenophiles, then you  can be welcomed on the red carpet or even treated like king. In stark  contrast, groups of religious, racial or sexual minorities have  experienced marginalization and mistreatment in many regions in the  world. Also, being a xenophile, you can drive pleasure from showing your  kindness and hospitality, which contributes to your well- being.
       In  general, Vietnamese people are labelled as typical xenophiles.  Nonetheless, when asked, most Vietnamese women said they don’t want to  marry a foreign man, though a Western guy is desirable to be added in  their friend/boyfriend list. Why it is the case? In social science,  xenophiles don’t necessarily have affection for real foreign people, but  they tend to fall for things that define or conceptualise that person.  Their affection sometimes originates from an idea of a collective  population which has been generalised. Most of the time, these  generalising comments are based on subjective perceptions rather than  facts or evidence.
       The answer to the question what causes xenophila  remains inconclusive. The compelling theory is that xenophilia is a  response to one’s negative feelings about his or her background. If you  was born in a poor or backward country, you are unconsciously prone to  welcome those whose background is superior to yours.
    References:  https://study.com/academy/lesson/what-is-xenophilia.html
     
    Questions to ponder:

     1. Do you think you are a xenophile or a xenophobe? What are the clues for being a xenophile?
     2. For whom your chemistry is stronger? A Vietnamese guy/girl or a foreign guy/girl?
     3. What are the benefits of xenophilia?
     4. Why do people become xenophiles or xenophobes?
     5. In Vietnamese context, xenophilia may create different problems in society. What are they? How to tackle these problems?
      6. Foreign English teachers are paid much higher than Vietnamese  counterparts. Is it fair? Does xenophilia involve? How to cope with  this?

     

     

    Prepared by: Ngo Huy Tu

     

    Enjoy and have a fruitful discussion! 
    See you on Sunday at 3 P.M.!
     

    Advance English club
    Address: Nguyen Cong Tru Secondary School – No. 8 Nguyen Truong To, Hanoi

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    Learning material 1

    (06:58:27 AM 04/04/2014)

     In order to speak a foreign language well, you’re supposed to think in that language. We all know this. The idea is so widely accepted among learners that it’s almost a cliché. So why don’t we do it?  Why don’t we think in the language that we're trying to speak?


    People often contrast thinking in your target language with translating.  Supposedly people who don’t speak fluently are thinking things up in their native language and then trying to translate it to the target language.

    I don’t think that’s what’s really happening. While there may be some very misguided learners who literally do think out a sentence and then try to translate it, most of us don’t do this. In fact, I don’t think I put my sentences together in English before I start speaking. And I’m a pretty self-controlled, watch-what-you-say kind of guy. So to suggest that I’m pre-preparing English sentences before translating them to Japanese is silly.

    So what am I doing?  Why am I not thinking in my target language? I think that speakers start by formulating abstract concepts that they want to express. These concepts are pre-linguistic. So for example, an idea might start off as a vague concept of coldness and a feeling of surprise. When I put those together in English, I get the sentence “Wow, it’s cold in here!”. When I try to put the same concepts together in another language, I end up assembling whatever words and phrases I know into something that may or may not get that idea across.

    Imagine playing a game of Scrabble. You have 7 letters on your little wooden Scrabble bench that you can make words of. Essentially you have two strategies: 1) Look at the letters that you have plus what’s on the board and try to think of the best word you can make. 2) Think of a really awesome word that you’d like to spell that would get you a lot of points, and then try to make it with the letters you have.

    When the game is Scrabble, it’s obvious which is the better strategy. But when we’re playing “Speak a Foreign Language” it’s astonishing how often we do the equivalent of Strategy 2: think something up that would be awesome to say, and then go searching through our mental Scrabble bench to find the words and grammatical structures that might be used to express that thought.

    I’m convinced that the most fluent foreign language speakers tend not to use language this way. Instead of constructing sentences around concepts they want to express, the flow goes the other way. They choose the concepts based on the language they have handy.

    To take the Scrabble metaphor one step further than it should probably be taken, imagine that for a given situation, you have seven utterances queued up ready to use. So for cold rooms, you have “Wow, it’s cold in here,” “Are you cold?” “Can we turn the heat up a bit?” etc.  Your job is just to select which one fits best and push the mental play button.  And because you’re not a robot, you can improvise a bit - swap out a noun here, add an adjective there.  This seems a lot more useful, and also a lot closer to what goes on in most L1 communication.

    Yes, there are times when you'll need to express something that's out of your comfort zone and will have to roll up your sleeves and put a sentence together the old fashioned way. But for the other 90% of the time, use what you already have.

    What’s hard about doing this is adopting the correct mindset. You have to limit yourself only to the things you know how to express.  I admit that I have a really hard time with this. When someone asks me, for example, what I think of my job, I want to give my truest, most nuanced opinions of my coworkers, the industry I work in, and my daily lunch routine. But wouldn’t it be better for everyone concerned if I just gave the somewhat conventional response they’re probably looking for anyway? And then maybe I can look for a way to express myself in more detail the next time it comes up.

    What do you think?  Am I on the right track? Way off base?  Let me know in the comments

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