English proverb of the day

"The negative side of the American Dream comes when people pursue success at any cost, which in turn destroys the vision and the dream "

  • Ảnh quảng cáo Slide
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  • Topic of this Week: "TOURISM (June 23, 2019)"

    Tourism is still booming as one of the largest industries around the world. It boosts the economic growth of a country while providing potential job creation for residents. For instance, by estimating to serve approximately about 15.6 million foreign tourists and about 80 million domestic travelers, Vietnam generate receives 620 trillion VND (26.66 billion USD) in tourism and a rise of more than 25 thousand employees per years.
    From another angle, tourism can also have many negative impacts on the quality of life. One of them is that it leads to the overcrowding on such places as Barcelona, Venice and Spain. Venice, a city of 60 000 people, welcomes nearly 30 million visitors a year, that 76000 tourists a day. Spain welcomed over 82 million travelers in 2017 with 9 million visiting Barcelona alone. Even, CNN 10 reported on 28 of May, there were a significant rise in the number of hiker climbing Mount Everest, which led to traffic jams on the climbing path.

    How about the other impacts of tourism? Come to Advance Hanoi to discuss and contribute your personal opinions.

    QUESTIONS TO PONDER:

    1. In your opinion, what is the positive and negative effects of tourism? How important is tourism to your country and to you? Do you think tourism destroy the culture of a place?
    2. How many types of tourism do you know? What types will be a trend next 10 years?
    3. Nowadays, some tourists do not concern with the culture of the destination, what do you think about this case? What lead you to decide to travel to a place?
    4. Some tourists assert that the culture of Vietnam is the same as that of China? Do you agree or disagree with it? Why (not)? What will you introduce to your foreign friends about Vietnam?
    5. Who is a smart traveler? How can we be the smart travelers?

    Prepared: Chirpy Duong

     

     

    Enjoy and have a fruitful discussion!    
    See you on Sunday at 3 P.M.!!!     

     

    Advance English club
    Address: Nguyen Cong Tru Secondary School – No. 8 Nguyen Truong To, Hanoi

    Website:               http://www.advanceclub.net
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    Fluency

    (06:56:14 AM 04/04/2014)

     In order to speak a foreign language well, you’re supposed to think in that language. We all know this. The idea is so widely accepted among learners that it’s almost a cliché. So why don’t we do it?  Why don’t we think in the language that we're trying to speak?


    People often contrast thinking in your target language with translating.  Supposedly people who don’t speak fluently are thinking things up in their native language and then trying to translate it to the target language.

    I don’t think that’s what’s really happening. While there may be some very misguided learners who literally do think out a sentence and then try to translate it, most of us don’t do this. In fact, I don’t think I put my sentences together in English before I start speaking. And I’m a pretty self-controlled, watch-what-you-say kind of guy. So to suggest that I’m pre-preparing English sentences before translating them to Japanese is silly.

    So what am I doing?  Why am I not thinking in my target language? I think that speakers start by formulating abstract concepts that they want to express. These concepts are pre-linguistic. So for example, an idea might start off as a vague concept of coldness and a feeling of surprise. When I put those together in English, I get the sentence “Wow, it’s cold in here!”. When I try to put the same concepts together in another language, I end up assembling whatever words and phrases I know into something that may or may not get that idea across.

    Imagine playing a game of Scrabble. You have 7 letters on your little wooden Scrabble bench that you can make words of. Essentially you have two strategies: 1) Look at the letters that you have plus what’s on the board and try to think of the best word you can make. 2) Think of a really awesome word that you’d like to spell that would get you a lot of points, and then try to make it with the letters you have.

    When the game is Scrabble, it’s obvious which is the better strategy. But when we’re playing “Speak a Foreign Language” it’s astonishing how often we do the equivalent of Strategy 2: think something up that would be awesome to say, and then go searching through our mental Scrabble bench to find the words and grammatical structures that might be used to express that thought.

    I’m convinced that the most fluent foreign language speakers tend not to use language this way. Instead of constructing sentences around concepts they want to express, the flow goes the other way. They choose the concepts based on the language they have handy.

    To take the Scrabble metaphor one step further than it should probably be taken, imagine that for a given situation, you have seven utterances queued up ready to use. So for cold rooms, you have “Wow, it’s cold in here,” “Are you cold?” “Can we turn the heat up a bit?” etc.  Your job is just to select which one fits best and push the mental play button.  And because you’re not a robot, you can improvise a bit - swap out a noun here, add an adjective there.  This seems a lot more useful, and also a lot closer to what goes on in most L1 communication.

    Yes, there are times when you'll need to express something that's out of your comfort zone and will have to roll up your sleeves and put a sentence together the old fashioned way. But for the other 90% of the time, use what you already have.

    What’s hard about doing this is adopting the correct mindset. You have to limit yourself only to the things you know how to express.  I admit that I have a really hard time with this. When someone asks me, for example, what I think of my job, I want to give my truest, most nuanced opinions of my coworkers, the industry I work in, and my daily lunch routine. But wouldn’t it be better for everyone concerned if I just gave the somewhat conventional response they’re probably looking for anyway? And then maybe I can look for a way to express myself in more detail the next time it comes up.

    What do you think?  Am I on the right track? Way off base?  Let me know in the comments

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